Tumblr of Kevin Woodland

My other Tumblr blogs: Class Blog, Times of Day, IMG SRC, Pelotron, A History of Forms, Flat Shot

stem-cell:


nortonism:
The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…
“You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.” ― John Berger, Ways of Seeing

stem-cell:

nortonism:

The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

“You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.” ― John Berger, Ways of Seeing

thegetty:

In 1854 the British Museum hired Roger Fenton to test the newfangled medium of photography to document its collection, rather than the usual modes of drawings and engravings. Fenton was at it for seven and a half years. 
This heavy-footed moa, a massive bird that became extinct following humans’ arrival in New Zealand, was once in the British Museum’s Hall of Fossils. Despite being both dead and flightless, the bird later moved across town to the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.
Dinornis elephantopus, about 1855, Roger Fenton. The J. Paul Getty Museum

thegetty:

In 1854 the British Museum hired Roger Fenton to test the newfangled medium of photography to document its collection, rather than the usual modes of drawings and engravings. Fenton was at it for seven and a half years. 

This heavy-footed moa, a massive bird that became extinct following humans’ arrival in New Zealand, was once in the British Museum’s Hall of Fossils. Despite being both dead and flightless, the bird later moved across town to the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.

Dinornis elephantopus, about 1855, Roger Fenton. The J. Paul Getty Museum

Lowell Street Warehouse Photos

Here are a few drafts from my new photo series that involves tightly cropped rectangular forms.

The idea occurred to me as a result of the simple geometric composition studies I’ve been doing in acrylic on canvas (calling them paintings sounds too lofty).